Language and Food : Verbal and nonverbal experiences.

This paper investigates the socialization into healthy food practices in a Danish multi-ethnic kindergarten classroom within the frameworks of Linguistic Ethnography (Creese, 2008; Rampton, Maybin & Tusting, 2007) and Language Socialization (Ochs, 1988; Schieffelin, 1990). I present micro-analys...

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Main Author: Szatrowski, Polly E.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014.
Series:Pragmatics & Beyond New Series
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100 1 |a Szatrowski, Polly E. 
245 1 0 |a Language and Food :  |b Verbal and nonverbal experiences. 
264 1 |a Amsterdam :  |b John Benjamins Publishing Company,  |c 2014. 
264 4 |c ©2014. 
300 |a 1 online resource (324 pages) 
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490 1 |a Pragmatics & Beyond New Series ;  |v v.238 
505 0 |a Language and Food -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- I. Introduction -- 1. Introduction to Language and food: Verbal and nonverbal experiences -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous research related to language and food -- 3. Emerging themes related to language and food -- 3.1 Ritual and performance -- 3.2 Food description, identification and assessment -- 3.3 Food, language and identity -- 3.4 Child and adult socialization through food -- 3.5 Verbal and nonverbal resources in talk about food -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix A -- Data -- English translation -- Japanese romanization (Szatrowski, 2004a, p. viii, 2010b, pp. 16-17) -- Appendix B -- The taster meal -- II. Process and structural organization -- 2. Negotiating a passage to the meal in four cultures -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Stages of commensality and their pragmemic triggers -- 2.1 The "outside world" and departures from it -- 2.2 Transit: Outside world to threshold - The "invited state" -- 2.3 Transit: Crossing the threshold - The"gathering place" -- 2.4 Transit: Passage to "the table" - The "arrival at the table" -- 2.5 Transit: Beginning the Meal - Commensality -- 2.6 Transit: Leaving "the table" - The "post commensal activity" -- 2.7 Transit: Departure (crossing the threshold) - The "departing place" -- 2.8 Transit: Re-entry into the "outside world" - The "reciprocating status" -- 3. A ritual approach -- 3.1 Ritual and commensality -- 4. Pragmemic triggers in four cultures -- 4.1 The invitation -- 4.2 Greeting / Welcome -- 4.3 Summons to "the table" -- 4.4 Signal to eat -- 4.5 Invitation to leave "the table" -- 4.6 Statement of departure -- 4.7 Expression of gratitude -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- 3. The structural organization of ordering and serving sushi -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 3. Data and methodology -- 4. Analysis. 
505 8 |a 4.1 Opening: Establishing mutual recognition and relevant identities -- 4.2 Closing -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- III. Talking about the food while eating -- 4. It's delicious! How Japanese speakers describe food at a social event -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Food talk as performed culture -- 3. Trends in Japanese expressions of tastiness -- 4. Methodology -- 5. The data -- 6. Discussion -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix A -- Appendix B -- 5. Food and identity in Wolof and Eegimaa: We eat what we are -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Motivations for lexical borrowing -- 2.1 Loanwords in Wolof -- 2.2 Loanwords in Eegimaa -- 3. Demarcation/ evaluative motivation for lexical borrowing -- 3.1 Wolof examples of loanwords for demarcation/ evaluative motivation -- 3.2 Eegimaa examples of loanwords for demarcation/ evaluative motivation -- 4. Food and identity -- 5. Language and identity -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- 6. Modality and evidentiality in Japanese and American English taster lunches -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous research -- 3. Data -- 4. Analysis -- 4.1 Modal and evidential categories and quantitative results -- 4.2 Analysis of the conversational interaction -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- IV. Experiences and stories related to food -- 7. Food experiences and categorization in Japanese talk-in-interaction -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Analysis -- 3. Food, association, and categorization -- 3.1 Previous studies -- 3.2 Temporal concepts: Seasons -- 3.3 Spatial concepts: A case of the region of a country -- 3.4 Identity concepts: A case of nationality -- 3.5 Concepts of events and personal experiences: The case of athletics day -- 4. Categorization of food by knowing and unknowing participants -- 4.1 Previous studies -- 4.2 Comparing similarities and contrasting differences: -(p)poi '-ish' and categorization. 
505 8 |a 4.3 Ad hoc category creation in the interaction: mitai 'like' -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- 8. Repetition of words and phrases from the punch lines of Japanese stories about food -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous research on repetition in a storytelling -- 2.1 Repetition as an evaluative device -- 2.2 Repetition as a reference to a shared story -- 3. Data and methodology -- 4. Analysis -- 4.1 Excerpt 1: Kayo's use of the word syooyu 'soy sauce' to evaluate her taste -- 4.2 Excerpt 2: Using the phrases booru ip-pai 'a full bowl" and mi o motte 'with one's own body' -- 4.3 Excerpt 3: Using the phrase omise no kimari 'rule of the restaurant' to preemptively evaluate -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- V. Talk about food with and among children -- 9. Family mealtimes, yuckiness and the socialization of disgust responses by preschool children -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous research on disgust and children's understanding, perception and use of disgust -- 2.1 Psychological approaches to disgust -- 2.2 Children's understanding of disgust -- 2.3 Use of disgust labels -- 2.4 Adults' and children's responses to facial expressions of disgust -- 2.5 A note on methodology -- 3. Observational and discursive analysis of actual family mealtimes -- 3.1 Disgust markers used by preschool children ("yuck") -- 3.2 Disgust markers used by adults ("Eugh") with preschool children -- 3.3 Parents' response to disgust markers: Ignoring disgust -- 3.4 Disgust or distaste? -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- 10. Early experiences with food: Socializing affect and relationships in Japanese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 3. Overview of meal and snack time in household and preschool -- 4. Three practices at meal and snack time -- 4.1 Talking about food -- 4.2 Finishing all of one's food -- 4.3 Behaving properly at the table -- 5. Conclusion -- References. 
505 8 |a 11. "I needa cut up my soup": Food talk, pretend play, and gender in an American preschool -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous research -- 3. Methodology and participants -- 4. Brief overview -- 5. Gender differences in food talk and food related activity -- 6. Examples of food-related talk: Girls -- 6.1 Creating collectivity: Girls' repetition and choral ensemble -- 7. Boys' food related talk: Food intermission and self-reports in a transformed room -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- 12. The interactional use of milk, juice and water in an ethnically diverse kindergarten class -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Healthy food, discourse and socialization -- 3. Methodology -- 4. The school context -- 5. Analysis -- 5.1 Appropriate drinks for lunch -- 5.2 Placemats as illustrations of healthy food -- 5.3 The different values of milk -- 6. Concluding discussion -- References -- Author index -- Subject index -- Food names and descriptor index -- Commensality expressions. 
520 |a This paper investigates the socialization into healthy food practices in a Danish multi-ethnic kindergarten classroom within the frameworks of Linguistic Ethnography (Creese, 2008; Rampton, Maybin & Tusting, 2007) and Language Socialization (Ochs, 1988; Schieffelin, 1990). I present micro-analyses of three situations where the health value of milk, water, and juice is topicalized. Health is a moral concept which is culturally embedded but linguistically constructed and negotiated. I discuss how learning outcomes in health educational activities depend on individuals' understandings prior to interactions and on the process of co-ordinating understandings. Also, in children's conversations nutritional value becomes an interactional resource. The paper contributes to prior research with a micro-analytic perspective on the role of health education in wider processes of social exclusion and intercultural (mis)understandings. 
588 |a Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources. 
590 |a Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.  
650 0 |a Botswana -- Economic conditions.. 
650 0 |a Botswana. 
655 4 |a Electronic books. 
776 0 8 |i Print version:  |a Szatrowski, Polly E.  |t Language and Food : Verbal and nonverbal experiences  |d Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2014  |z 9789027256430 
797 2 |a ProQuest (Firm) 
830 0 |a Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 
856 4 0 |u https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/suleyman-ebooks/detail.action?docID=1577466  |z Click to View