Argentine Youth : An Untapped Potential?.

Argentina's youth are an important, but to a certain extent untapped, resource for development. Over 2 million (31 percent) have already engaged in risky behaviors, and another 1 million (15 percent) are exposed to risk factors that are correlated with eventual risky behaviors. This totals 46 p...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Bank, World.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Herndon : World Bank Publications, 2009.
Edition:1st ed.
Series:Country Studies
Subjects:
Online Access:Click to View
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Table of Contents:
  • Intro
  • Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • Acronyms and Abbreviations
  • Executive Summary
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Demographics and Framework
  • Demographics
  • The Framework
  • 3. Education and Learning
  • High Enrollments, but Challenges for the Poor
  • Ensuring Quality Remains a Challenge
  • Risk Factors Impede School Progression
  • Challenges in Expanding Education for the Poor and Marginal
  • 4. Labor Markets and Business Cycles
  • Difficult Times for Youth in Employment, Unemployment, and Wages
  • Youth Fared Badly During Business Cycles
  • Higher Occupational Mobility for Youth
  • The Challenges of Unemployment, Instability, and Early Labor Force Entry
  • 5. Growing Up Healthy
  • Tobacco-Youth Are Starting to Smoke Younger
  • Alcohol Consumption Is Highly Associated with Other Risky Behaviors
  • Illegal Drug Use Is Fairly Low, but Usually Starts during Youth
  • Promoting Healthy Lives
  • 6. Forming Families
  • Argentine Youth Are Sexually Initiated at Younger Ages
  • Education Is Important for Increased Contraceptive Use
  • Poor Youth Are Most at Risk for Unplanned Pregnancies
  • High HIV/AIDS Infections May Mean Youth Aren't Aware of Risks
  • Better Family Formation to Benefit Today's Youth-And Tomorrow's
  • 7. Citizenship and Participation
  • Youth and Citizenship-The Challenge of Integration
  • Crime and Violence-Obstacles to a Successful Transition
  • Actions to Promote Citizenship and Reduce Crime and Violence
  • 8. Youth Policy Directions To Reduce Youth At Risk
  • Realizing the Benefits of the Demographic Dividend
  • Achieving a More Effective Mix of Youth Policies
  • Further Policy Directions
  • Appendix: Argentina at a Glance
  • References
  • Map: Argentina
  • Table 1.1. Top Problems Identified By Youth Ages 15-24, By Socioeconomic Strata
  • Table 1.2. Youth Behaviors and Outcomes Are Interrelated.
  • Table 2.1. Youth Ages 15-24 in 2005, Selected Countries
  • Table 2.2. Youth in Argentina, By Risk Status
  • Table 3.1. Education Indicators in Latin America and the Caribbean and the OECD
  • Table 3.2. Net Secondary School Enrollment Rates, Selected Years 1992-2005
  • Table 3.3. Population and Enrollment Growth in 1980, 1991, and 2001
  • Table 3.4. Gross Enrollment Rates in Argentina, By Age and Gender, 1992-2005
  • Table 3.5. Nonenrollment, By Area, 2001
  • Table 3.6. Nonenrollment and Attendance Rates By Quintile for 6-17-year-olds
  • Table 3.7. Average Years of Education, By Household Income Quintile, 1992, 2000, and 2005
  • Table 3.8. Test Scores for Latin America and the OECD in 2000
  • Table 3.9. Educational Outcomes of Young People, By Age
  • Table 3.10. Mothers' and Children's Schooling in Greater Buenos Aires in 2005-Maxium Level of Education Achieved
  • Table 3.11. Likelihood of Starting Secondary School, 2005
  • Table 3.12. Likelihood of Completing Secondary School, 2005
  • Table 3.13. Is a Student Likely to Complete Secondary School?
  • Table 4.1. Age Distribution of Employed Workers, 1992, 2000, and 2005
  • Table 4.2. Duration of Unemployment
  • Table 4.3. Change in Wage Returns over Business Cycles
  • Table 4.4. Change in Likelihood of Being Unemployed over the Business Cycle
  • Table 4.5. Paths Followed by Youth and Adult Workers in the Labor Market, 1995-2003
  • Table 5.1. Mortality Rate for Ages 15-24
  • Table 5.2. Mortality Due to External Causes, Ages 15-24
  • Table 5.3. Projected Numbers of 15-year-Olds in 2003 Who Will Die Before the Age of 60
  • Table 5.4. Mortality per 100,000 Caused by Road Traffic Injury for Ages 15-29
  • Table 5.5. Tobacco Use in Adolescents
  • Table 5.6. Patterns of Tobacco Use for Youth Ages 15-24
  • Table 5.7. Estimated Relative Odds of Smoking Frequently.
  • Table 5.8. Patterns of Alcohol Use for Youth Ages 15-24
  • Table 5.9. Estimated Relative Odds of Drinking Alcohol on a Regular Basis
  • Table 5.10. Patterns of Drug Use for Youth Ages 15-24
  • Table 5.11. Estimated Relative Odds of Having Consumed Drugs
  • Table 6.1. Economic and Social Costs of Early Pregnancies
  • Table 6.2. Child Mortality Indicators, Selected Countries
  • Table 6.3. Child Heath Indicators, Selected Countries
  • Table 6.4. Maternal Health Indicators, Selected Countries
  • Table 6.5. Cumulative Percentage of Sexually-initiated Youth, By City of Residence and Gender
  • Table 6.6. Discrete Event History Estimates Predicting Sexual Initiation Until Age 19 for Men
  • Table 6.7. Discrete Event History Estimates Predicting Sexual Initiation Until Age 19 for Women
  • Table 6.8. Proportion of Sexually-initiated Women Who Have Used Condoms and the Birth Control Pill
  • Table 6.9. Proportion of Sexually-initiated Women Who Have Used Contraception, By Education and Age Group
  • Table 6.10. Percentage of Live Births to Mothers Below the Age of 20 for Selected Regions in Argentina, 2004
  • Table 6.11. Discrete Event History Estimates Predicting Adolescent Pregnancy
  • Table 6.12. HIV/AIDS Prevalence Estimates among Youth, Selected Countries
  • Table 7.1. Voting Behavior and Participation of Youth 18-24, By Income Quintile
  • Table 7.2. Declared Level of Trust in the Judicial System, By Age and Income Quintile
  • Figure 2.1. Fertility Rate and Life Expectancy
  • Figure 2.2. Population Distribution in 1990
  • Figure 2.3. Population Distribution in 2000
  • Figure 2.4. Population Distribution in 2020
  • Figure 2.5. Population Distribution in 2040
  • Figure 2.6. Distribution of Youth Across Regions in Argentina, 2001
  • Figure 2.7. Share of Youth By Region, 2001
  • Figure 2.8. Five Youth Transitions to Adulthood.
  • Figure 3.1. Nonenrollment Rates, Ages 6-17, 1980, 1991, and 2001
  • Figure 3.2. Enrollment and Population By Age, 2001
  • Figure 3.3. Per Capita GDP and Average Test Scores, Selected Countries
  • Figure 3.4. Paths for Students 15-30 Years Old in Greater Buenos Aires
  • Figure 4.1. Ratio of Youth to Total Unemployment in Selected Latin American Countries, Average 1993-2003
  • Figure 4.2. Unemployment Rates, By Age, 1992-2003
  • Figure 4.3. Youth Employment and Unemployment Rates, 1992-2003
  • Figure 4.4. Proportion of All Youth Employed and Unemployed in 2005, By Income
  • Figure 4.5. Proportion of All Youth Employed and Unemployed in 2005, By Gender
  • Figure 4.6. Average Hourly Wage, By Educational Level
  • Figure 4.7. Average Hourly Wage, By Age Group
  • Figure 4.8. Relative Youth (15-24) and Adult (25-60) Wages, By Region, 1992-2003
  • Figure 4.9. Distribution of Occupations By Category and Age, 1995-2003
  • Figure 5.1. Living with Both Parents Decreases Substance Abuse
  • Figure 7.1. Domestic Violence, School Dropout, and Early Sexual Initiation in Four Provinces in Argentina
  • Figure 7.2. Homicide Rates for Males
  • Figure 7.3. Homicide Rates for Females
  • Figure 7.4. Male Homicide Victims, By Age
  • Figure 7.5. Female Homicide Victims, By Age
  • Box 1.1. Definitions and Concepts
  • Box 1.2. World Development Report 2007 and the Regional Youth Study for Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Box 1.3. Data Used for Analyses
  • Box 2.1. Conceptual Framework for Youth at Risk
  • Box 4.1. Typology of Labor Market Paths
  • Box 7.1. Digital Inclusion
  • Box 7.2. Monitoring and Evaluation among Youth NGOs-Youth As Key Actors at Each Step
  • Box 8.1. Youth Are an Asset to Society
  • Box 8.2. Interventions for Youth at Risk That Don't Work.