The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions.

Conference proceedings presenting the first opportunity for leading figures in the burgeoning area of archaeological research in the Kurdish Autonomous Region of Iraq to gather and present all the key new projects which are revolutionising our understanding of the region.

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Kopanias, Konstantinos.
Other Authors: MacGinnis, John.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Oxford : Archaeopress, 2016.
Edition:1st ed.
Subjects:
Online Access:Click to View
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Table of Contents:
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Authors' details
  • Preface
  • Archaeological investigations on the Citadel of Erbil: Background, Framework and Results
  • Dara Al Yaqoobi, Abdullah Khorsheed Khader, Sangar Mohammed, Saber Hassan Hussein, Mary Shepperson and John MacGinnis
  • Archaeological investigations on the Citadel of Erbil: Background, Framework and Results
  • Figure 1. Erbil Citadel, areas demarcated for archaeological investigation.
  • Figure 2. Area E, plan of the excavations.
  • Figure 3. Area E, elevation of the fortification wall.
  • Figure 1. General view of the site from the west. Source: Author.
  • The site of Bazyan: historical and archaeological investigations
  • Narmin Amin Ali and Vincent Deroche
  • The site of Bazyan: historical and archaeological investigations
  • Figure 2. Plan showing the location of soundings. Source: Author.
  • Figure 3. The sanctuary and the nave. Source: Author.
  • Figure 4. Northern sounding 4. Source: Author.
  • Figure 5. Stratigraphy of northern sounding 4. Source: Author.
  • Figure 7. Stratigraphy of northern sounding 5. Source: Author.
  • Figure 8. Initial northeastern sector. Source: Author.
  • Figure 9. Quadruple column. Source: Author.
  • Figure 1. Tell Nader, Northern Ubaid: bowls with zigzag lines (predominantly fine clay, less inclusions, wet finish, greenish overfired).
  • Short notes on Chalcolithic pottery research: The pottery sequences of Tell Nader (Erbil) and Ashur (Qal'at Sherqat)
  • Claudia Beuger
  • Short notes on Chalcolithic pottery research: The pottery sequences of Tell Nader (Erbil) and Ashur (Qal'at Sherqat).
  • Figure 2. Tell Nader, Early Northern Ubaid: a. painted sherds (predominantly fine clay, organic temper, burnish, brownish-buff with reddish-brown painting), b. fragments of lenticular jars with a high spout (?) (fine clay, organic temper and lime inclusio
  • Figure 3. Tell Nader, post-Ubaid: a. bowls with a groove on the rim, b. 'Wide Flower-Pots', c. conical bowls, d. concave bowls, e. neckless jars with flaring rim, f. double rimmed jar, g. double mouthed jar (predominately fine clay, organic temper, burn
  • Figure 4. Ashur, Ubaid: a. painted rim (?) sherd (Bär 2003, 289 Taf. 146)
  • b. incised herring bone pattern (fine clay with mineral inclusions and some coarse organic temper, hand-made, buff-reddish-greenish
  • Beuger 2007, cat. II pl. 117, 3), c. applicatio
  • Figure 5. Ashur, post-Ubaid: neckless jars with flaring rim (predominately fine clay with mineral inclusions and some coarse organic temper, buff
  • Beuger 2007, cat. II 69.12, 72.14-17
  • 27.10-11, 32.2-3).
  • Figure 6. Ashur, LC3-4: casserole bowls (?) (fine clay with mineral inclusions and some coarse organic temper, buff, Beuger 2007, cat. I pl. 7,4
  • cat. II pl. 19. 12-13).
  • New Evidence of Paleolithic Occupation in the Western Zagros foothills: Preliminary report of cave and rockshelter survey in the Sar Qaleh Plain, West of the Kermanshah Province, Iran
  • New Evidence of Paleolithic Occupation in the Western Zagros foothills: Preliminary report of cave and rockshelter survey in the Sar Qaleh Plain, West of the Kermanshah Province, Iran
  • Fereidoun Biglari and Sonia Shidrang
  • Figure. 1. Location of recorded Paleolithic sites recorded in the Kermanshah and Islamabad Plains during the 1980s and 1990s.
  • Figure 2. Kal-e Davoud Cave: (a) Plan of the cave drawn in 2007 showing location of the 1961 test pit
  • (b) General view of the cave.
  • (c) Single side-scraper found during visit of the site in 2007.
  • Figure 3. Middle Paleolithic lithic artifacts from Khosrawi, south-west of Ghasr-e Shirin.
  • Figure 4. Locations of recorded Paleolithic sites in the lowland regions of Sar Pol-e Zahab, Ghasr-e Shirin and Azgeleh.
  • Figure 5. The physical geography of the survey area.
  • Figure 6. Geological map of the Azgeleh region showing the location of the Sar Qaleh survey area.
  • Figure. 7. Map of the Sar Qaleh Plain showing location of recorded sites in 2010.
  • Figure 8. General view of the sites recorded in the Tang-e Janga and other potential sites.
  • Figure 9. Plan of Tang-e Janga 3 cave, general view of the pass and location of the cave, and close-up of its entrance.
  • Figure 10. The mouth of Tang-e Janga 6 cave.
  • Figure 11. General view of the Sewar Hawār showing locations of some of the sites recorded in 2010.
  • Figure 12. Sheikh Rozin: (a) Southern end of the Salmaneh Mountain showing location of the Sheikh Rozin site group
  • (b) Sheikh Rozin sites.
  • Figure 13. Sheikh Rozin 3, view looking south from the shelter entrance.
  • Figure 14. Plan of Sheikh Rozin 8 cave.
  • Figure 15. Two forms of raw material from the study area: (a) tabular chert and (b) nodular chert.
  • Figure 16. Upper Paleolithic bladelet core from Sheikh Rozin 7.
  • Figure 17. Selected Upper Paleolithic artifacts from Sar Qaleh sites.
  • Figure 18. Selected Epipaleolithic artifacts from Sar Qaleh sites.
  • Activities of Sapienza-University of Rome in Iraqi Kurdistan: Erbil, Sulaimaniyah and Duhok
  • Activities of Sapienza-University of Rome in Iraqi Kurdistan: Erbil, Sulaimaniyah and Duhok
  • Carlo Giovanni Cereti and Luca Colliva
  • Figure 1. Erbil Civilization Museum, cataloguing activities of the numismatic collection (photo DiSA).
  • Figure 2. Slemani Museum, 3D model of Narseh's bust from Paikuli monument (photo DiSA, processing Studio 3R).
  • Figure 3. Erbil Citadel, topographic map of the Citadel with the position of the geophysical surveys (photo DiSA, processing Studio 3R).
  • Figure 4. Erbil Citadel, 2D ERT section of the Main Street and of two crossing streets (photo DiSA, processing TERR.A.IN).
  • Figure 5. Erbil Citadel, 2D ERT section of the North Gate area (photo DiSA, processing TERR.A.IN).
  • Figure 6. Erbil Citadel, 2D ERT section at the base of the tell slope, in front of the North Gate (photo DiSA, processing TERR.A.IN).
  • The Achaemenid Period Occupation at Tell ed-Daim in Iraqi Kurdistan
  • The Achaemenid Period Occupation at Tell ed-Daim in Iraqi Kurdistan
  • John Curtis and Farouk al-Rawi
  • Figure 1. Plan of the building at Tell ed-Daim (from al-Tikriti 1960: pl. 1).
  • Figure 2. Pottery vessels from Level 1 at Tell ed-Daim (from al-Tikriti 1960: pl. 5).
  • Figure 3. Pottery (nos. 11-12) and stone (nos. 14-16) vessels from Level 1 at Tell ed-Daim (from al-Tikriti 1960: pl. 5).
  • Figure 4. Bronze horse-bit from Tell ed-Daim, IM 60180 (from al-Tikriti 1960: pl. 10/4).
  • Figure 5. Bronze kohl-jars from rooms 2 (right) and 9 (left) at Tell-ed-Daim, IM 60182-3 (from al-Tikriti 1960: pl. 10/2-3).
  • Figure 6. Silver disc with embossed flower design from Tell ed-Daim, IM 60172 (from al-Tikriti 1960: pl. 11/13).
  • Figure 7. Bronze wall plaques from Tell ed-Daim, IM 60191 A-B (from al-Tikriti 1960: pl. 9).
  • Figure 8. Stone scoops from Tell ed-Daim, IM 60206, 60208 (from al-Tikriti 1960: pl. 5/17-18).
  • Figure 9. Bronze horse-bits from Persepolis (left) and Deve Hüyük (right) (from Ivantchik 2001: Fig. 86/1,3).
  • Figure 10. Bronze kohl-bottles from Nimrud (left), Tell Jigan (centre) and Khirbet Hatara (right). (From left, drawings by J. E. Curtis, from Ii and Kawamata 1984-5: Fig. 18 on p. 183, and from Fiorina 2007: Fig. 12/53a).
  • Figure 11. Bronze wall-plaques from Nimrud (from Curtis 2013: pl. XXIV/399-400).
  • Figure 12. Stone scoop from Persepolis (from Curtis and Tallis 2005: pl. 139).
  • Figure 13. Silver scoops from Erzincan (British Museum nos. 123263-4).
  • 'Inscription D' from Sennacherib's Aqueduct At Jerwān: Further Data and Insights
  • 'Inscription D' from Sennacherib's Aqueduct At Jerwān: Further Data and Insights
  • Frederick Mario Fales and Roswitha Del Fabbro*
  • Figure 1. Elevation and plan of the SW sector of the Jerwān aqueduct, scale 1:500, from Jacobsen and Lloyd 1935, Fig. 3 (courtesy of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago).
  • Figure 2. 'Inscription D' on the southern façade of the western sector of the aqueduct. At top (i.e. left), the CAD-generated elevation of the façade with indication of the position of the inscribed blocks
  • below (center-right), the individual segments
  • Figure 3. A view from west of the so-called 'repaired breach': to the left of the dotted line is the original structure
  • to the right of the dotted line are the two rows of the restoration: elaboration after Jacobsen and Lloyd 1935, pl. X B (courtesy of t
  • Figure 4. Chisel marks on the outer bands of a block (photo by M. Gatti, © MAIA).
  • Figure 5. Rusticated blocks of the original structure to the east of the 'repaired breach' (photo by M. Gatti, © MAIA).
  • Figure 6. The conjunction between restoration and original structure (photo by M. Gatti, © MAIA).
  • Figure 7. Panoramic view of the central recess of the 'repaired breach'
  • note the masonry, which is slightly stepped downward (photo by M. Gatti, © MAIA).
  • Figure 8. Detail of Fig. 2 with block numbering inserted, and legend on newly visible/partly visible/no longer visible blocks after 2012 fieldwork (R. Del Fabbro, © MAIA).